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Virginia Frances Sterrett

Tanglewood Tales

Virginia Frances Sterrett: Tanglewood Tales Art Prints at Artsy Craftsy

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Second Book: Tanglewood Tales

In 1921, the Penn Publishing Company again commissioned her to illustrate an edition of Tanglewood Tales by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Tanglewood Tales, with its stories from Greek mythology was a favorite children's book of the time, one also illustrated by Arthur Rackham, Edmund Dulac, Anne Anderson and other Golden Age illustrators. Four images, from a early edition of Tanglewood Tales, are missing and we're working on that; otherwise we believe all the color illustrations are here.

Ariadne

Ariadne

Ariadne addressed Theseus: Thou has slain the monster

13 inches by 19 inches. $91

Cadmus saw Harmonia

Cadmus saw Harmonia

Cadmus beheld a female figure, wonderfully beautiful

13 inches by 19 inches. $91

'What is it?' asked Jason. He did not recognize the golden fleece.

The Golden Fleece

'What is it?' asked Jason. He did not recognize the golden fleece.

13 inches by 19 inches. $91

Circe's Palace, Virginia Frances Sterrett

Circe's Palace

To their vast astonishment, they saw their own figures perfect represented in different colored threads. It was a lifelike picture of their recent adventures.

13 inches by 19 inches. $91

Cadmus prepares to slay the pitiless reptile who had killed his poor companions, Virginia Frances Sterrett

The Dragon's Teeth

Cadmus prepares to slay the pitiless reptile who had killed his poor companions.

13 inches by 19 inches. $91

Medea whipped up the snakes and ascended high over the city

Medea Flew Over the City

Medea whipped up the snakes and ascended high over the city

13 inches by 19 inches. $91

Proserpina refused the pomegranate Pluto offered her, Virginia Frances Sterrett

Proserpina and the Pomegranate

Proserpina, the daughter of Ceres, was abducted by Pluto, ruler of the Underworld. After Proserpine was transported to Hades, she made the mistake of eating the seeds of a pomegranate. Ceres was consumed with grief and cast a blight upon the earth, so that it produced neither grain, nor flower, nor fruit. The people of the earth starved and Jupiter was forced to intervene. It was agreed that Proserpina would be returned to her mother, provided Proserpina had not eaten anything while in the underworld. Pluto, however, had persuaded Proserpina to eat part of a pomegranate, which she finally accepted. Therefore, the Fates refused to free Proserpina, but a compromise was reached whereupon she would spend six month each year with Pluto in the underworld, one for each pomegranate seed that she had eaten. The rest of the year she spends her mother, Ceres, the months we know as spring and summer. When Proserpina is with Pluto the earth is barren and cold and when she returns to her mother, Ceres pours forth the blessings of spring to welcome her beloved daughter home.

13 inches by 19 inches. $91

Book Illustrations

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Catalog of Artists

Edmund Dulac

Arthur Rackham

Virginia Frances Sterrett

Florence Harrison

Harold Gaze

Gustave Doré

Kay Nielsen

John Bauer

Pre-Raphaelites

Maxfield Parrish

Warwick Goble

Jessie M. King

Anne Anderson